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  • New Spam Campaign Distributes Locky Ransomware and Kovter Trojan Combined

    Criminals have taken a liking to the idea of combining multiple types of malware into one distribution campaign. Malware Protection Center researchers discovered a string of email messages using malicious attachments to spread both Locky ransomware and the Kovter Trojan. It is not the first time these two types of malware are distributed in the same campaign, as dual-pronged spam campaigns have become more common as of late.

    This morning we noticed the start of a campaign using  New notice to Appear in Court as the email subject. The attachments are identical to the Typical .JS, .WSF, .lnk file inside a double zip. All the sites seen so far today are the same sites used in the USPS, FedEx, UPS current campaigns.  I am sure that both campaigns will continue side by side. It is very likely that different “affiliates” are using the same distribution network, but each one prefers a different email lure to gain victims.

    The attachments all start with a zip named along the lines of Notice_00790613.zip which contain another zip Notice_00790613.doc.zip which in turn contains Notice_00790613.doc.js

    Criminals Step Up Malware Distribution

    It is rather disconcerting to learn opening a malicious email attachment can introduce two different types of malware at the same time. As if the Locky ransomware is not annoying to deal with on its own, computer users will also be affected by the Kovter Trojan. This latter piece of malware specialized in click fraud, generating a lot of illegal advertisement revenue for criminals.

    Through a malicious email attachment, criminals execute a script that contains links to multiple domains where the malware types are downloaded from. By making the attachment a .Ink file, the recipient may click it and have the payload download executed in the background. PowerShell scripts have become a fan favorite among criminals targeting Windows users these days, that much is certain.

    Researchers discovered a total of five hardcoded domains in the script from where the malware can be downloaded. Both the Locky ransomware and Kovter Trojan payloads are hosted on these platforms, and it is expected more of these domains will continue to pop up over time. Although law enforcement agencies can take down these domains rather easily, criminals will not hesitate to create additional hosting solutions over time.

    As one would expect from these spam email campaigns, the message in question is a fake receipt for a spoofed USPS delivery email. In the attached zip file, there is the malicious .Ink file , which initiates the PowerShell script once opened. One interesting aspect about this script is how it checks if the file is downloaded successfully and if is at least 10KB in size. Once that has been verified, it will stop the process automatically.

    Microsoft researchers feel the use of multiple domain names to download the payload from is a powerful obfuscation technique. Blacklisting one specific URL is a lot easier than dealing with a handful of different domains. Moreover, this method seems to hint at how criminals can easily add more servers to download the malicious payloads from if they want to. A very troublesome development, to say the least.

    Perhaps the most worrisome aspect of this new malware distribution campaign is how criminals continue to update the payloads themselves. Both Kovter and Locky receive regular updates, which means the development of ransomware and click-fraud Trojans is still going on behind the scenes. Moreover, it goes to show criminals will continue to rely on multi-pronged distribution campaigns for malware and ransomware moving forward.


  • Proteus botnet Malware with Remote Access

     

    The Proteus botnet emerged toward the end of November 2016.  Only a few samples of it were found in the wild and, at the moment, it doesn’t seem to have a widespread campaign.  So, what does it do? It launches a multi-layered attack on an infected machine where it runs several processes aimed at coin mining, credential theft, and keylogging.  In addition, the bot can perform on its own; it offers the cybercriminal to send commands over HTTP to download malicious executables and execute them.

     

    In some samples, the botnet disguises itself as a Google Chrome executable. The functionality of the botnet is highly reliant on its C&C (command and control) server, hxxp://proteus-network[.]biz or hxxp://proteus-network[.]ml (the latter is inaccessible). The URL is hardcoded in the sample and is contacted multiple times to obtain necessary credentials for the tasks the botnet performs. The host name also appears in Pastebin, under the URL hxxp://pastebin[.]com/raw/LidbEiiR, in its encrypted form, and the botnet can retrieve the domain from there as well.

     

    The botnet starts by identifying the infected machine and obtaining the operating system’s info (whether 64 or 86 bit), the machine’s name, and the Windows version. All of the information is sent to the C&C to “register” the machine.

     

    After the machine is acknowledged by the C&C, the botnet proceeds to perform different tasks. As the botnet contacts the C&C to receive various pieces of information, the web requests are sent along with an encrypted string specifying the purpose of the request. These encrypted strings perform the following functions:

     

    • api/register – Register the infected machine
    • api/ping – Check if the machine is already registered
    • api/module – Check the mining module
    • api/proxy – Use reverse proxy
    • api/command – Receive commands from the C&C
    • api/account – Receive an account from the C&C
    • api/log – Handle the key logging document

     

    The header section of the HTTP requests is similar throughout the different sections of the source code:

    Content-type: application-json

    Authorization: {2D592824-48DE-49F8-8F96-A40B3904C794}

     

    When contacting the C&C, a POST request is sent with one of the above modes appended to the domain’s name, for example, hxxp://proteus-network.biz/api/log. The C&C sends a response to this request, which is then parsed by the botnet in search for the C&C’s reply.

     

    CheckerTask:

     

    The CheckerTask starts by contacting the C&C with the api/account string appended to the domain’s name. After sending a POST request, it receives a four-tuple composed of an account ID, an e-mail, a password, and the account type. The botnet attempts to access and steal the user’s credentials from a number of online websites, including:

     

    • eBay.com
    • otto.de
    • amazon.de
    • breuninger.com
    • dhl.de
    • netflix.com
    • coderbay.net
    • zalando.de

     

    The majority of these websites are German-based and the botnet searches for German words appearing in the responses. This leads us to believe this specific sample of Proteus targets are German victims. For example, if the message received from the website includes the phrase “stimmen nicht mit den bei uns hinterlegten Daten”, which means, “This does not match the data provided by us”. The botnet attempts to change the password’s first character from lower case to upper case or to append the character “1” to the end of the password and tries to log in again after three seconds. The response from the website is then checked to harvest more information about the victim, including name, address, country, bought and sold items, seller type and the last feedback received.

     

    Some of the websites which the CheckerTask tries to steal the credentials from may include a Captcha to prevent such automated logins. The Proteus botnet uses Death by Captcha (DBC), an API which solves any given Captcha and turns it into a text that the botnet can insert into the website, and proceeds with the login. Using DBC requires a username and a password, which are both hardcoded into the sample to enable Captcha analysis. We have managed to access the DBC account used in the sample, and found that it resolved 200 Captchas so far, which could hint to the number of successfully infected machines.

     

    LoggerTask:

     

    This task performs key logging on the infected machine. It starts by initializing a list of all the keyboard keys, and stores the logged keys into a file called tmpV213.txt found under the TEMP directory. When this file includes more than 250 characters, it is cleared and its content is sent to the C&C along with the api/log string.

     

    CommandsTask:

     

    This task receives commands from the C&C. The botnet sends a request to the C&C with the fingerprint and the api/command string. If the C&C sends a command to download a file, a new directory is created in the TEMP folder using a GUID, and a file called temp.exe is created in that directory. Alternatively, if the command is to “kill”, the process is killed. The task checks for new commands every two minutes.

     

    MiningTask, EMiningTask:

     

    The C&C determines the type of mining which the infected machine attempts, as well as the mining pool it will join. The EminingTask downloads an executable to the TEMP directory with the name loader.exe. The types of mining that appear in the sample are CPU, Zcash, Scrypt, and SHA256. During the mining task, and depending on the chosen type, the resources of the infected machine, such as the memory, CPU, and RAM, are used to provide the computing power necessary to produce the hashes accepted as a proof of work by each method. Even using a pool instead of individual mining, CPU usage soared rapidly and reached 100% in our labs when we ran the sample, which shows the processing power needed for the mining tasks.

     

    Conclusion:

     

    To summarize, the botnet conducts a complex attack: it infects a machine, steals credentials, logs keys and mines for currency, causing CPU level to reach 100%. Although the botnet has many of the crucial implementation tools needed for its attack, it heavily depends on communication with its C&C server and the information it transmits for the execution of its most basic functions.


  • E-Payment Alert Notification From Another US Bank – Customer phishing scam

    A slightly unusual phishing scam today

    https://i2.wp.com/myonlinesecurity.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/scam_warning1.gif?fit=300%2C300&ssl=1

    The original email is nothing special and has a blank body and a PDF attachment. The PDF has a link to https://kamzink.com/redirect-new-alert-logon/redirect.htm which redirects you to ( or should redirect you to ) https://rattanhospital.co.in/new-usbank-security-update/usbank.com.online.logon/home  However this site only works in Firefox using Noscript when I block scripts from  omtrdc.net. ( which looks like an Adobe Marketing cloud analytics script)  Allowing scripts from that site display a blank page for me in all browsers.  I assume the phishers made a mistake and that script will only work on the genuine website so is  unable to display the page. This shows the error in just copy & pasting an entire website homepage  & just changing a few links on it.  Anyway, anything the phishers do wrong is a step in the right direction to protect users.

    Please read our How to protect yourselves page for simple, sensible advice on how to avoid being infected by this sort of socially engineered malware.

    The original email looks like this It will NEVER be a genuine email from your bank  any other company so don’t ever click the link in the email. If you do it will lead you to a website that looks at first glance like the genuine usbank website but you can clearly see in the address bar, that it is fake. Some versions of this and similar phishes will ask you fill in the html ( webpage) form that comes attached to the email.

    From: US BANK <unitedbankpayment.alert@communication.com>>

    Date: Wed 28/12/2016 08:15

    Subject: E-Payment Alert Notification From Another US Bank Customer

    Attachment: US_Bank_Payment_2_.pdf

    Body content:  Blank / Empty

    Following the link sends you to a site looking identical to the genuine usbank.com website ( with the above provisos)

    All of these emails use Social engineering tricks to persuade you to open the attachments that come with the email. Whether it is a message saying “look at this picture of me I took last night” and it appears to come from a friend or is more targeted at somebody who regularly is likely to receive PDF attachments or Word .doc attachments or any other common file that you use every day. Or whether it is a straight forward attempt, like this one, to steal your personal, bank, credit card or email and social networking log in details. Be very careful when unzipping them and make sure you have “show known file extensions enabled“, And then look carefully at the unzipped file. If it says .EXE then it is a problem and should not be run or opened.


  • Spoofed FedEx and USPS Kovter and Locky sites Ransomeware Malware Keeps Spreading

    www.ccrepairservices.com
    Locky Ransomeware New CPRS CCRS Computer Repair Miami Fort Lauderdale Website

    Following on from these  [ FEDEX ] [ USPS ]  posts describing the Spoofed FedEx and USPS ( and other delivery services from time to time) I will endeavour to keep up to date with a list of current sites involved in the spreading of this malware. I will also show the command used that day to obtain the malware. I will add each days new sites to the lists, but please remember that old sites are reused daily until taken down by their hosts.  All the sites used in this malware spreading campaign are hacked / compromised sites.

     

    The script tries the first in the list & then moves down until it gets a reply from the server. You never see the first downloaded file ( counter.js by searching on your computer, that is run directly from temp internet files ) Counter.js then downloads  a different variant of counter.js which in turn downloads 01 first, then 02, then 03 until you get to 05. If any site doesn’t have the file, then it moves to the next site in the list for that particular file. Each site on the list has a full set of the files. but it is rare for the site delivering counter.js to actually download from itself, normally that downloads from a different site on the list. All the files ( apart from the original counter.js) pretend to be png ( image files). They are actually all renamed .exe files or a renamed php script listing the files to be encrypted. Counter.js contains the list of sites to download from, which includes many of the sites listed in the original WSF, JS, VBS or other scripting file and normally one or 2 extra ones. to get the second counter.js you need to change the &r=01 at the end of the url to &m=01 ( or 02-05). This second counter.js contains additional sites to download from which frequently includes sites from the previous days lists that are not already included in the WSF or first counter.js.

    I only accidentally  found out about the second /3rd /4th /5th  counter.js when I made a mistake in manually decoding the original wsf file ( and the original counter.js) and mistyped/ miscopied  the &r= and used &m= instead. Obviously it is a belt and braces approach to making sure the actual malware gets downloaded to a victim’s computer when urls or sites are known about and blocked by an antivirus or web filter service.

    25 December 2016:  ( Payload Security report  )

    3spension.com
    minebleue.com
    chaitanyaimpex.org
    break-first.com
    grancaffe.net
    www.meizumalaysia.com
    dreamoutloudcenter.org
    megrelis-avocat.com

    /counter/?a=1DtntZgmur6occ1CY29PJzvAzLsjCXMuyD&m=9488599&i=e5J5zaa6WhR1MYhBZ8L8Rmw2RWRVmbtna9Y_vLRIrGW2mVxU7SBYLhBH9Gj5Mr942yUp7kFWRWAOGtmJ5aqexWRDrTq_rGixe_a-gmVCMQ

    /counter/?i=e5J5zaa6WhR1MYhBZ8L8Rmw2RWRVmbtna9Y_vLRIrGW2mVxU7SBYLhBH9Gj5Mr942yUp7kFWRWAOGtmJ5aqexWRDrTq_rGixe_a-gmVCMQ&a=1DtntZgmur6occ1CY29PJzvAzLsjCXMuyD&r=01

    27 December2016:  ( Payload Security report  )

    lacasadeicuochi.it
    boardedhallgreen.com
    www.memoodgetactive.det.nsw.edu.au
    rebecook.fr
    peachaid.com
    kidsgalaxy.fr
    baltasmenulis.lt
    artss.org

    /counter/?a=1HHDb3PbzDuGitWA7eW5oQFLzRjd1VzqhJ&m=3254807&i=Y5rzyqa6RhRlpx-dpPoqiXX2fW4GipPhNOTHtfBNJDBj6eEd6iZ3Yj9wAD7akn77R5LBqqvQvXIlyx_kYmBdyl0Bi12Qqds7  

    /counter/?i=Y5rzyqa6RhRlpx-dpPoqiXX2fW4GipPhNOTHtfBNJDBj6eEd6iZ3Yj9wAD7akn77R5LBqqvQvXIlyx_kYmBdyl0Bi12Qqds7&a=1HHDb3PbzDuGitWA7eW5oQFLzRjd1VzqhJ&r=01

    28 December 2016:  ( Payload Security report  )

    thanepoliceschool.com
    chimie.iset-liege.be
    partnersforcleanstreams.org

    /counter/?a=1N1rEZQQ9Z3Ju6jggwn7hFU1jXytBTcK7r&m=8429816&i=LXEfbBQo_qDv_k77jrIae7y_BHSSQ_IZeneRTOoRmdDa4RlnJqaUKIl03HhN683DsUx-hkDi_OiCy0bOPjhZTiYm8RSQDBkfCerE

    /counter/?i=LXEfbBQo_qDv_k77jrIae7y_BHSSQ_IZeneRTOoRmdDa4RlnJqaUKIl03HhN683DsUx-hkDi_OiCy0bOPjhZTiYm8RSQDBkfCerE&a=1N1rEZQQ9Z3Ju6jggwn7hFU1jXytBTcK7r&r=01

    29 December 2016:  ( payload Security report)

    cobycaresfoundation.org
    dev.zodia-q.com
    shark1.idhost.kz
    italysfinestdesign.it
    salutgaudi.com
    zodia-q.com

    /counter/?a=13h8Y8z3WfiDFYG7jEWgsqZmPL94z22ca1&m=2365622&i=a5P5yqa6RhR1p80JYSnJbDP0I9KOXtIPtIhrFT4SHyIIqBAg-BghzAkZFkHS2tXw5C3mJYnrwuc1MpOfvGWZGd_STcfaml86P_kj5gA

    /counter/?i=a5P5yqa6RhR1p80JYSnJbDP0I9KOXtIPtIhrFT4SHyIIqBAg-BghzAkZFkHS2tXw5C3mJYnrwuc1MpOfvGWZGd_STcfaml86P_kj5gA&a=13h8Y8z3WfiDFYG7jEWgsqZmPL94z22ca1&r=01

    2nd version today ( Payload Security Report )

    /counter/?=&i=a5P71qa6RhRlpLdtPLsJBpD0aKRuq7EtvIQrHyyE-zmVoG37HDoS-OmdfAXYY-Y0RtEcCwavHQyucNU4JL_PpGxvv0l-mxt00fo&a=16TqYh72RpopqiWR97WGMNtTGTazWFYBg1&r=01

    /counter/?a=16TqYh72RpopqiWR97WGMNtTGTazWFYBg1&m=4831333&i=a5P71qa6RhRlpLdtPLsJBpD0aKRuq7EtvIQrHyyE-zmVoG37HDoS-OmdfAXYY-Y0RtEcCwavHQyucNU4JL_PpGxvv0l-mxt00fo

    31 December 2016: ( Payload Security Report)

    www.iblasoni.com
    aventurarealestatedirectory.com
    www.apogeoform.net
    oytunidil.com
    ocentsinus.com
    sonja.ostrovanka.cz
    instalaciondeairesplit.com

    /counter/?a=1J9cj5Z7UvwkR9Tp1qywXBq994MFZ6dCLn&i=Y5p7yaa6RhRlPVwtx_0twhfOcSziOus6gsFi-6WQ9cGftnod2TtjVWJvU-_2nroNgi-lT8j6sF6rzL02lqFLiuQ20RDPqOBkTCSmGjp6NQ
    /counter/?i=Y5p7yaa6RhRlPVwtx_0twhfOcSziOus6gsFi-6WQ9cGftnod2TtjVWJvU-_2nroNgi-lT8j6sF6rzL02lqFLiuQ20RDPqOBkTCSmGjp6NQ&a=1J9cj5Z7UvwkR9Tp1qywXBq994MFZ6dCLn&r=01

    31 December 2016: update 2 ( Payload Security)

    spiritdoula.net
    www.yabaojiuhe.com
    windycrestrental.com
    maggieellisbusinessconsulting.com
    pn-group.com
    inflation.us

    /counter/?a=16ehyeR9Nhrtgk4z2BrKZVJcKTFYe9Z1Ap&i=Y5r71qa6RhRlpLdvFNp4Tyf0O3puCoDDA0TLPwt-ZnjyqdV140NpvPnVGT2KeqxNu7AHi0Gk1WT6yYGkb0YxpcGpOaMzrto7
    /counter/?i=Y5r71qa6RhRlpLdvFNp4Tyf0O3puCoDDA0TLPwt-ZnjyqdV140NpvPnVGT2KeqxNu7AHi0Gk1WT6yYGkb0YxpcGpOaMzrto7&a=16ehyeR9Nhrtgk4z2BrKZVJcKTFYe9Z1Ap&r=0


  • New KillDisk wiper varient threatens industrial control networks with Ransomware Trojan

    The TeleBots gang, which recently attacked Ukrainian banks with KillDisk malware that used Mr. Robot imagery (pictured), may now be targeting industrial control systems with a ransomware variant.

    The TeleBots gang, which recently attacked Ukrainian banks with KillDisk malware that used Mr. Robot imagery (pictured), may now be targeting industrial control systems with a ransomware variant.

    The KillDisk disk-wiper program that was used in conjunction with BlackEnergy malware to attack Ukrainian energy utilities has evolved into ransomware that may be targeting industrial-control networks.

    According to researchers at CyberX, the new variant was developed by the TeleBots cybergang, which recently emerged from the Sandworm threat group that is believed to have disrupted the Ukrainian power grid offline in December 2015 and January 2016, and allegedly compromised U.S. industrial-control systems and SCADA systems in 2014. Earlier this year, ESET researchers reported that TeleBots was a using different version of KillDisk to conduct cybersabotage attacks against the Ukrainian financial sector.

    In a blog post on Tuesday, CyberX reported that the ransomware variant is distributed via malicious Office attachments and displays a pop-up message demanding 222 Bitcoins, which is currently the equivalent of approximately $206,000. The variant’s exorbitant ransom and its link to Sandworm suggests that the group could be actively launching ransomware attacks against industrial-control networks.

    KillDisk uses a mix of RSA 1028 public key and AES shared key algorithms to encrypt local hard-drives and network-mapped folders that are shared across organizations, CyberX further reported.


  • Android Trojan Switcher Infects Routers via DNS Hijacking – Android Trojan Switcher Infects Routers via DNS Hijacking

    A new Android Trojan uses a victims’ devices to infect WiFi routers and funnel any users of the network to malicious sites. The malware doesn’t target users directly – instead its goal is to facilitate further attacks by turning victims into accomplices.

     

    Researchers at Kaspersky Lab, who discovered the malware and dubbed it Switcher Trojan, claim they’ve seen two versions of the malware. Attackers have used both iterations to commandeer 1,280 wireless networks, most of them in China, according to Nikita Buchka, a mobile security expert with the firm.

    One version of the malware mimics a mobile client for the Chinese search engine Baidu. Another passes itself off as a version of an app used for locating and sharing WiFi login information. Once a victim has downloaded one of the versions, it gets to work attacking the router.

    The malware does so by carrying out a brute-force password guessing attack on the router’s admin web interface. Once in, Switcher swaps out the addresses of the router’s DNS servers for a rogue server controlled by the attackers along with a second DNS, in case the rogue one goes down.

    This makes it so queries from devices on the network are re-routed to the servers of the attacker, something that can open victims to redirection, phishing, malware and adware attacks.

    “The ability of the Switcher Trojan to hijack [DNS] gives the attackers almost complete control over network activity which uses the name-resolving system, such as internet traffic,” Kaspersky Lab said Wednesday, “The approach works because wireless routers generally reconfigure the DNS settings of all devices on the network to their own – thereby forcing everyone to use the same rogue DNS.”

    The creators of the Trojan were a little sloppy when it came to crafting parts of its command and control website however; they left a table complete with internal infection statistics publicly viewable. According to Buchka, who has reviewed the site, the attackers boast to have infiltrated 1,280 WiFi networks over the last several weeks.

    In a Securelist post on the malware posted Wednesday Buchka cautioned users to review their routers’ DNS settings for the following rogue servers: 101.200.147.153, 112.33.13.11, and 120.76.249.59. He also took the opportunity to encourage users – although for many it goes without saying – to verify that they’ve changed their routers’ default login and passwords.

    Several weeks ago a handful of router users in Germany fell victim when a variant of Mirai, the nasty malware that’s become synonymous with internet of things vulnerabilities, took hold of their devices. While those routers didn’t suffer from a hardcoded username/password vulnerability, they did have port 7547, usually used by internet service providers to remotely manage the device, open.

    The behavior of Switcher is somewhat similar to that of DNSChanger, malware that’s been repurposed as an exploit kit as of late. A recent campaign observed by Proofpoint was targeting wireless routers and changing DNS entries in order to steal traffic. In that instance routers made by D-Link, Netgear, Pirelli and Comtrend were vulnerable. According to Buchka, the hardcoded names of input fields and the structures of the HTML documents that the Switcher Trojan tries to access suggests it may work only on web interfaces of TP-LINK Wi-Fi routers.


  • CTB-Locker ransomware spreading through fake Windows 10 Update emails

    With the highly publicized release of Microsoft’s Windows 10 on July 29th, scammers and malware developers were quick to jump in and use it as a method of distributing malware. Cisco’s Talos Group has discovered a email campaign underway that pretends to be from Microsoft and contains an attachment that will supposedly allow you to upgrade to Windows 10. In reality, though, this email is fake and once you double-click on the attached file, you will instead become infected with the encrypting ransomware CTB-Locker.

    win10_blacked_out.png

    Image of fake Windows Update Email courtesy of Cisco

    As you can see the email pretends to be from the email address update@microsoft.com and contains the subject [b]Windows 10 Free Update. Even the email message looks legitimate with no spelling mistakes or strange grammar. This is because the content is copied directly from Microsoft’s site. The only tell-tale sign is that there will be some characters that do not render properly. Unfortunately, this small sign will not be enough for many people to notice.

    Furthermore, once they download the attachment and extract it, the attached Win10Installer.exe icon will be the familiar Windows 10 logo.

    It isn’t until you inspect the file properties of the attachment, do you see that something is not right as its file description will be iMacros Web Automation and the copyright for the program will belong to Ipswitch. Ipswitch is a legitimate company and not the ones who released this malware.

    Finally, if a user double-clicks on the Win10Installer.exe file, they will not be greeted with the normal Windows 10 upgrade screen. Instead, after a brief delay they will be shown the screen for the CTB-Locker ransomware.

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    CTB-Locker Computer Virus removal and data file recovery service. Local and Online service. Fort Lauderdale,Miami, Boca Raton and all South florida

    At this point, the computer’s data will be encrypted and there is not much that can be done about it.

     

    IF INFECTED Visit Our Main Site OR call 754-234-5598

    for latest computer repair and online news.

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  • Cryptowall 3.0 is back and rapidly spreading – Ransom Virus Malware Spyware Spam Email

    Cryptowall 3.0 Spreading again Removal DecrypterCryptowall 3.0 Rapidly Spreading again Removal Repair Recovery and Decrypter
    Cryptowall 3.0 Spreading again Removal DecrypterCryptowall 3.0 Rapidly Spreading again Removal Repair Ransom Recovery and Decrypter CALL 754-234-5598

    Since the Angler Exploit Kit began in late May spreading Cryptowall 3.0 ransomware, traffic containing the malware has continued to grow, putting more potential victims in harm’s way.

    A week ago, the SANS Internet Storm Center reported that Cryptowall 3.0 infections are emanating from not only the prolific exploit kit, but also from malicious spam campaigns. The two means of infections share some common characteristics, lending credence to the theory that the same group may be behind both.
    Version 3.0 is the latest iteration of Cryptowall, which is also known as Crowti. Like other ransomware families, Cryptowall 3.0 encrypts files stored on a compromised computer and demands a ransom, usually $500 payable in Bitcoin, in exchange for the encryption key. The malware uses numerous channels to communicate and send stolen traffic to its keepers, including I2P and Tor anonymity networks. Researchers at Cisco in February said that Cryptowall 3.0 abandoned using a dropper for propagation, opting instead to use exploit kits.

    As of this morning, SANS incident handler and Rackspace security researcher Brad Duncan said that the latest run of Angler Exploit Kit traffic showed that the attackers had added a different Bitcoin address than the one used previously.

    At this point, I’m not 100 percent certain it’s the same actor behind all this Cryptowall 3.0 we’ve been seeing lately,” Duncan wrote on the SANS ISC website. “However, my gut feeling tells me this activity is all related to the same actor or group. The timing is too much of a coincidence.

    Duncan said that a check on blockchain.info for activity on the two Bitcoin addresses shows some transactions, indicating some victims are paying the ransom.

    “We’re seeing a lot more samples of CryptoWall 3.0 in the spam/EK traffic now than before, so maybe the increased exposure might help infect more computers,” Duncan said, adding that he had no data on whether any of the victims who did pay the ransom were receiving encryption keys and are able to salvage their data.

    Duncan said this latest spike began May 25 from both the malicious spam and Angler angles; both campaigns were still active as of early this morning.

    The spam campaign uses Yahoo email addresses to send Cryptowall 3.0 via attachments. The attachments are called my_resume.zip and contain an HTML file called my_resume.svg. Duncan said the attackers have begun appending numbers to the file names, such as resume4210.html or resume9647.html.

    Opening the attachment and extracting the malicious file gives you an HTML document. If you open one of these HTML files, your browser will generate traffic to a compromised server,” Duncan wrote. “The return traffic is gzip compressed, so you won’t see it in the TCP stream from Wireshark. Exporting the text from Wireshark shows HTML that points to a shared document from a Google server.

    Cryptowall is hosted on a number of different docs.google.com URLs, he said, a list of which is posted on the SANS website. The Bitcoin address used for payment in the spam campaign is 16REtGSobiQZoprFnXZBR2mSWvRyUSJ3ag, the same address found in other spam samples.

    Infections coming from Angler began May 26, and were the first Cryptowall 3.0 infections seen from Angler. The Bitcoin address used in Angler infections is 16Z6sidfLrfNoxJNu4qM5zhRttJEUD3XoB, SANS said. Duncan reports that a second Bitcoin address, 12LE1yNak3ZuNTLa95KYR2CQSKb6rZnELb, was used as of today.

    “There are any number of reasons to use more than one Bitcoin address. It could be a back-up, in case law enforcement is closing in on the other one. It could be a way to track different infections, geographically,” Duncan said. “I’m not sure on this one. It’s just my gut feeling, which could be wrong.”

    Duncan said that a new slate of WordPress sites were redirecting to Angler in this campaign, based on web injects observed.

    “The significance is that there are plenty of vulnerable websites running outdated or unpatched versions of WordPress,” Duncan said. “The actors behind this (and other) campaigns will have a continuous supply of websites that can be compromised and used for these efforts.”

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  • Malicious Ads on Yahoo, AOL, Match.com, Trigger CryptoWall Infections

    cryptowall

    Attackers have been leveraging the FlashPack Exploit Kit to peddle the CryptoWall 2.0 ransomware on unsuspecting visitors to sites such as Yahoo, The Atlantic and AOL. Researchers believe that for about a month the malvertising campaign hit up to 3 million visitors and netted the attackers $25,000 daily.

    According to experts at Proofpoint, a firm that primarily specializes in email security, the exploit kit targeted a vulnerability in Adobe Flash via users’ browsers to install the ransomware on users’ machines.

    Malvertising is an attack that happens when attackers embed malicious code – in this case code that led to the latest iteration of CryptoWall – into otherwise legitimate ads to spread malware via drive-by downloads. Users can often be infected without even clicking on anything.

    CryptoWall, which takes users’ files, encrypts them with rigid RSA-2048 encryption, then asks for a fee to decrypt them, made a killing earlier this summer. In August it was reported that the ransomware made more than $1.1 million for its creators in just six months.

    Similar to Critoni/Onion, a ransomware dug up in July, CryptoWall 2.0 downloads a TOR client on the victim’s machine, connects to a command and control server and demands users send Bitcoin – $500 worth – to decrypt their files. Since the campaign lasted about a month, from Sept. 18 to this past Saturday, researchers are estimating that 40 of the campaign’s Bitcoin addresses collected at least 65 BTC each, a number that roughly translates to $25,000 a day.

    cryptowall1

    Proofpoint claims that high ranking sites such as AOL, The Atlantic, Match.com and several Yahoo subdomains such as their Sports, Fantasy Sports and Finance sites, were spotted serving up the tainted ads. Other sites lesser known in the U.S. such as Australia’s Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and the Brisbane Times, were reportedly also doling out the ads.

    While the campaign started a month ago the firm claims things didn’t start to ramp up until recently.

    “After crossing a threshold level, it became possible to associate the disparate instances with a single campaign impacting numerous, high-traffic sites,” Wayne Huang, the company’s VP of Engineering, said of the campaign.

    The firm claims it worked quickly to notify those involved in the campaign, including the ad providers, and as of this week, believes the situation has been nullified.

    Last month researchers with Barracuda Labs found a CryptoWall variant with certificate signed by Comodo being distributed through ads on a handful of different websites. None of those sites were nearly as trafficked as those spotted by this most recent campaign however. The Alexa rankings for Yahoo (4), AOL (37), Match (203), and The Atlantic (386) place them within the top 500 of the internet’s most popular sites, something that likely upped the campaign’s exposure level.

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  • New file-encrypting ransomware called CryptoGraphic Locker

    A new file-encrypting ransomware was discovered today by BartBlaze called CryptoGraphic Locker. Just like other encrypting ransomware, this infection will scan your your data files and encrypt them so that they are unusable. The infection will then display a ransom note that requires you to purchase the decryption key in order to decrypt your files. The initial cost to purchase the key is .2 BTC, or approximately $100 USD, which makes this one of the cheaper ransoms that we have seen in a long time. Though the ransom starts out small, there is a 24 hour timer built into the application that will increase the ransom amount each time it hits 0.

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    Cryptographic Locker

    When you are infected with CryptoGraphic Locker, the application will configure itself to start when you login to Windows. It will then scan your drives for data files and create new encrypted copies using AES encryption and then delete the old ones. These new files will be renamed to have the extension .clf. A list of all encrypted files will be stored in the %Temp%\CryptoLockerFileList.txt file. The data files that CryptoGraphic Locker targets are:

    .odt,.ods,.odp,.odm,.odc,.odb,.doc,.docx,.docm,.wps,.xls,.xlsx,.xlsm,.xlsb,.xlk,.ppt,.pptx,.pptm,.mdb,.accdb,.pst,.dwg,.dxf,.dxg,.wpd,.rtf,.wb2,.mdf,.dbf,.psd,.pdd,.pdf,.eps,.ai,.indd,.cdr,.dng,.3fr,.arw,.srf,.sr2,.mp3,.bay,.crw,.cr2,.dcr,.kdc,.erf,.mef,.mrw,.nef,.nrw,.orf,.raf,.raw,.rwl,.rw2,.r3d,.ptx,.pef,.srw,.x3f,.lnk,.der,.cer,.crt,.pem,.pfx,.p12,.p7b,.p7c,.jpg,.png,.jfif,.jpeg,.gif,.bmp,.exif,.txt

    When the infection has finished encrypting your data it will display a ransom screen that explains how you can pay the ransom and decrypt your files. Unlike other file-encrypting ransomware that have been released lately, instead of using a decryption site, the malware application itself allows you to make payments, receive your decryption keys, enter your key to decrypt files, etc. While the infection is running it will also terminate the following applications if they are started or are running: Process Hacker, MalwareBytes, Spyhunter, Msconfig, Task Manager, Registry Editor, System Restore, or Process Explorer.

    Last, but not least, the infection will also change your Windows desktop background to the background below. Suprisingly, it uses the CryptoLocker name in the wallpaper instead of the CryptoGraphic Locker name that it uses in the application window.

    wallpaper.jpg

    At this time the Command & Control servers are down, so there is no way to pay the ransom. There is, though, some good news for those who are infected. This ransomware does not delete files using a secure deletion method and does not wipe your system restore points. Therefore you can use a file recovery tool to undelete your files or a program like Shadow Explorer to restore your files from Shadow Volume Copies. Information on how to restore your files from Shadow Volume Copies can be found in the CryptoLocker guide.

    Thanks to BartBlaze, Decrypterfixer, and Cody Johnston for providing info on this malware.

    File additions and registry changes are:

    %Temp%\CryptoLockerFileList.txt
    %Temp%\wallpaper.jpg
    <Path to Dropper>\<random.exe
    
    HKCU\Control Panel\Desktop\Wallpaper	"C:\Users\User\AppData\Local\Temp\wallpaper.jpg"(old value="")
    HKCU\Control Panel\Desktop\WallpaperStyle	"1"(old value="10")
    HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\CLock
    
    

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  • Rise in Anti-Child Porn Spam Protection Ransomware infections

    This ransomware pretends to be from a legitimate government organization that states that the infected computer is sending out SPAM that contains links to child pornography sites. The ransom program then states that in order protect yourself, and others, it has encrypted your data using Advanced Encryption Standards, or AES, encryption. Just like the Malware Protection and the ACCDFISA Protection Program variants, these files are not actually encrypted but are password protected RAR files.

    sl.png

    ScreenLocker window for ACCDFISA v2.0, There are actually a few different versions of this. ACCDFISA v2.0 HTML file, These can be worded slightly different, and can have different emails to message the virus creator.

    There seems to be either a leak of the ACCDFISA v2.0 source, or the creator is mixing up the layout of Ransom Note, Screen Locker, and even the internal code. So far I have found 3 different version of ACCDFISA v2.0 with different contact emails, Ransom Notes, Code, and what is worse is even the method of delivery. The previous ACCDFISA v2.0 mostly only affected servers with RDP enabled with weak security. But the last 2 victims I have been messaging had neither a server or RDP enabled, and claimed to have gotten it either by email or a malicious or hacked site. This makes this older modified infection another top placer for worst encrypting infections because the key is unrecoverable, Restore Points are wiped, the computer is locked down, services are mangled, free space and deleted files are wiped with SDelete, and of course files are encrypted with WinRar SFX AES exe’s.

    For informational purposes, the 2 virus creator emails I have found with these variants are brhelpinfo@gmail.com and Dextreme88@gmail.com.

    When first run, this program will scan your computer for data files and convert them to password protected RAR .exe files. These password protected data files will be named in a format similar to test.txt(!! to decrypt email id <id> to <Email>@gmail.com !!).exe. It will then use Sysinternal’s SDelete to delete the original files in such a way that they cannot be undeleted using file recovery tools. It will also set a Windows Registry Run entry to start c:\<Random Number>\svchost.exe when your computer starts. This program is launched immediately when you logon and blocks access to your Windows environment. If you boot your computer using SafeMode, Windows Recovery disk, or another offline recovery CD, you can delete or rename the c:\<Random Number>\svchost.exe file in order to regain access to your Windows Desktop. This “lockout” screen will also prompt you to send the hackers the ransom in order to get a passcode for the system lockout screen and for your password protected files.

    This variant took 3 hours to completely finish on my VM. I was able to access the key file, and decrypt nearly all files and back them up before shutdown. So if you are lucky enough to see this happening, you should immediately backup the key file on the desktop / in the ProgramData folder.

    Sadly, just like the past variants, files cannot be decrypted either without the key, or a backup. If you are reading this infection free I have one question, Have you backed up today?. If not, you better get to it as these types of computer infections are on the rise and definitely here to stay!

    The files that this infection creates when it is installed are:

    File List:

    c:\<Random>\svchost.exe – ScreenLocker / Decrypter

    c:\<Random>\howtodecryptaesfiles.htm – RansomNote that all RansomNotes lnk’s point to

    c:\ProgramData\fdst<Random>\lsassw86s.exe Encrypter / Main dropper

    c:\ProgramData\<Random>\<Random>.dll – Different Numbers and Hashes used by the infection / Also where Temp Key is kept, But removed after completion

    c:\ProgramData\<Random>\<Random>.DLLS List of files to be infected by WinRar

    c:\ProgramData\<Random>\svchost.exe – WinRar CUI renamed

    c:\ProgramData\<Random>\svchost.exe – Sdelete Renamed

    c:\ProgramData\svcfnmainstvestvs\stppthmainfv.dll List of Numbers used by the infection

    c:\ProgramData\svtstcrs\stppthmainfv.dll List of Numbers used by the infection

    c:\Windows\System32\backgrounds2.bmp Renamed ScreenLocker / Decrypter, Used to replace the one in ProgramData if deleted

    c:\Windows\System32\lsassw86s.exe Renamed Encrypter / Main dropper, Used to replace the one in ProgramData if deleted

    c:\Windows\System32\scsvserv.exe Used to complete mangle / disable services to further lock down computer

    c:\Windows\System32\lsassvrtdbks.exe Assists with encryption

    c:\Windows\System32\session455.txt Temp Storage used with .BAT file to logoff user account

    c:\Windows\System32\decryptaesfiles.html Used to copy to ProgramData

    c:\Windows\System32\Sdelete.dll Used to copy Sdelete to ProgramData

    c:\Windows\System32\kblockdll.dll Used to Lock desktop

    c:\Windows\System32\btlogoffusrsmtv.bat Used to log user off

    c:\Windows\System32\default2.sfx Used with winrar to encrypt files

    c:\Windows\System32\cfwin32.dll WinRar CUI renamed

    %Desktop%\<Random>.Txt – Also contains Decrypt Key, But removed after completion

    Registry List:

    HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run C:\<Random>\svchost.exe – Launches ScreenLocker

    HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run C:\<Random>\svchost.exe – Launches ScreenLocker

    HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run C:\ProgramData\<Random>\svchost.exe – Launches ScreenLocker

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  • Secret Government and Law enforcement spyware leaked

     

    Company That Sells 'FinFisher' Spying Software Got Hacked, 40GB Data Leaked
    FinFisher spyware, a spyware application used by government and law enforcement agencies for the purpose of surveillance, appears to have been hacked earlier this week and a string of files has been dumped on the Internet.
    The highly secret surveillance software called “FinFisher” sold by British company Gamma International can secretly monitors computers by turning ON webcams, recording everything the user types with a keylogger, and intercepting Skype calls, copying files, and much more.
    A hacker has claimed on Reddit and Twitter that they’d infiltrated the network of one of the world’s top surveillance & motoring technology company Gamma International, creator of FinFisher spyware, and has exposed 40GB of internal data detailing the operations and effectiveness of the FinFisher suite of surveillance platforms.
    The leaked information was published both on a parody Gamma Group Twitter account (@GammaGroupPR) and Reditt by the hacker that began publishing links to the documents and satirical tweets.
    The leaked files includes client lists, price lists, source code of Web Finfly, details about the effectiveness of Finfisher malware, user and support documentation, a list of classes/tutorials, and much more.
    The Reddit post Gamma International Leaked in self.Anarchism said, “a couple days ago [when] I hacked in and made off with 40GB of data from Gamma’s networks. I have hard proof they knew they were selling (and still are) to people using their software to attack Bahraini activists, along with a whole lots of other stuff in that 40GB.”

    The FinFisher files were first leaked on Dropbox as a torrent file and since have been shared across the internet, which means that it is now impossible to stop the information from being leaked.

    One spreadsheet in the dump titled FinFisher Products Extended Antivirus Test dated April this year, details the anti-virus detection rates of the FinFisher spyware which German based Gamma Group sold to governments and law enforcement agencies.

    It shows how FinFisher performed well against 35 top antivirus products. That means FinFisher would probably not be detected by a targeted users’ security systems.


    One more document also dated April this year has been identified that detailed release notes, for version 4.51 of FinSpy, show a series of patches made to the products including patch to ensure rootkit component could avoid Microsoft Security Essentials, that the malware could record dual screen Windows setups, and improved email spying with Mozilla Thunderbird and Apple Mail.


    The file dump also reveals that FinFisher is detected by OS X Skype (a recording prompt appears), so the users of OS X Skype would be alerted to the presence of FinFisher by a notification indicating that a recording module was installed.
    Company That Sells 'FinFisher' Spying Software Got Hacked, 40GB Data Leaked
    FinFisher cannot tap Windows 8 users, so rather the desktop client, the users should opt for the Metro version of Skype.
    The dump also contains a fake Adobe Flash Player updater, a Firefox plugin for RealPlayer and an extensive (though still undetermined) documentation for WhatsApp.

    A price list, which appeared to be a customers’ record, revealed the FinSpy program cost 1.4 million Euros and a variety of penetration testing training services priced at 27,000 Euros each,” the Reg. reported. “The document did not contain a date but it did show prices for malware targeting the recent iOS version 7 platform.”

    The leaked documents also included a FinSpy user manual and brochure. This previously kept so-called spying secret is not a secret now and we’ll be going to find a lot more in the upcoming weeks.

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